Category Archives: Sip reviews

Mercer Wine of Washington State

I was caught a bit off-guard when I first sipped a 2015 Mercer Sharp Sisters Horse Heaven Hills red blend. The blackberry taste of syrah dominated the blend of which a majority was cabernet sauvignon, followed by syrah, merlot, petit verdot, Grenache and a bit of carignane; all grapes were grown in Washington State.

Mercer

Although elements of Rhône, France wine tasted familiar, the terroir of Washington State was foreign to my palate. I had met plenty of California, French, Eastern Europe and Italian wines, but this was my first encounter with Washington State, considered in the wine world to be “the new kid on the block”.

Out of three wines I sampled, one caught my attention as the winner in the trio, and surprisingly it turned out to be the white wine in the bunch: a 2016 Mercer Horse Heaven Hills sauvignon blanc. A clean, fresh aroma of citrus and newly bundled hay set the stage for a refreshing taste of perfectly ripened fruit and balanced acidity. The fruit hailed from the rolling hills on the Mercer estate Princeton vineyard in Horse Heaven Hills, where the climate proved agreeable for this second vintage, with cool nights and warm days. Priced around $15, this bottle is worthy of a purchase, but I suggest getting a case before they sell out.

My third taste was an inky 2015 Mercer Horse Heaven Hills malbec, a better taste than many Argentine malbecs I’ve consumed. This is a wine that opens nicely, escalating in jammy flavors. The grapes were grown in Spice Cabinet Vineyard in the Horse Heaven Hills on a southeast slope above the Columbia River. The crop received morning sun exposure and avoided the afternoon harshness of the sun. The wine-making skills excelled, with a double sort, and without crush. It’s the whole berry for this malbec, aged in both new and old French oak barrels for 18 months, and then blended together. It works.

For more information on Mercer wines, visit MercerWine.com.

Advertisements

Blind tasting 16 rosé wines

Following almost two years living in the Napa Valley, I was finally invited to Spottswoode. Alas, I never tasted a drop of Spottswoode wine, but I did sit across from Beth, the owner, and it was an amazing experience to listen to her feedback.

The reason I sat at the tasting table in this historic family estate in St. Helena was to blind taste 16 rosé wines. The event was coordinated by Claire Ducrocq Weinkauf, a French native who grew up in Auvergne and moved to Calistoga with her husband, winemaker at Spottswoode. Claire is the owner of Calistoga’s Picayune Cellars & Mercantile, and I love her rosé.

Tasting in groups of four wines, there were about 8 wine tasters who sniffed, swirled, sniffed and sipped to decide whether each rosé was Old World or New World, hipster-worthy and within price ranges of under $15, $16-$25 or over $26 a bottle. We graded by number and discussed the wines of each grouping.

The million dollar question remains: Is rosé is a wine to take seriously or is it a pool wine … a flavored beverage? Could rosé be food-pairing-worthy and serious competition among whites and reds? Well, one factor is certain: rosé wine has piqued as a summer trend for 2017. My guess is that the strong will survive, and out of 16 tastings, I’ll share with you my shortlist of five worthwhile rosé wines to sip past summer.

#1 – Azur 2016 – New World, Hipster, over $26 blend of gamay, Grenache and barbera grapes.

#2 – Terrebrune – Old World, established, over $36 a bottle

#3 – Miraval – Yes, this is the Angelina Jolie/Brad Pitt rosé – Old world, $16-$25 a bottle, soft on the palate and good minerality.

#4 – Picayune – made with syrah, Grenache and barbera grapes, priced $16-$25, New World and hipster

#5 – Hogwash – New World made with Grenache grapes with alluring aroma and taste

Remember, rosé all day!

The drip on sipping cold brewed coffee

Without the bitter oils and acid finish in a sip of coffee, cold brewed coffee made in the Dutch or Japanese style… in a slow ice-drip, changes the taste to an almost caramel texture coffee experience. I recently tested a new product on the market, Dripo by gosh! and after my initial confusion in why I would want to wait 2-plus hours for a cup of cold coffee, I tasted it and get the idea….sort of. 

At first, the concept was lost on me. I opened the container that looked to be a carton of milk, and inside was a cylinder with three twist off parts. Fortunately, I had a guest staying with me who took charge of the initial testing. Unfortunately, the first go at making this brew took all day. I later realized that she had placed the thin coffee filter on the bottom instead of the top of the grounds, and this caused it to slow down considerably. In fact, I tried it twice and realized that its best to skip using the coffee filter on top since there is a metal filter built in.

The problem for me is that i don’t really like cold coffee, and that’s what I got. Delving deeper into this phenomenon of cold-brewed coffee, I was advised to simply add a bit more coffee grind and then add boiled water so I could taste a cup of hot, yet cold-brewed coffee. The result was a caramel-smooth texture of weak coffee I really didn’t want to continue brewing in this effort-heavy method. Oh, and the cap with the pour-out lid doesn’t work.

Come summertime, I will definitely make another attempt to enjoy this when the thought of drinking a cup of hot coffee is unfathomable. But for now, some like it cold, but I like my coffee hot and brewed in my traditional coffeemaker.

For those who have joined the craze of cold coffee, Dripo by gosh! is sold on Amazon.com at this time for about $30, and is patent-pending. Be sure to hashtag #howyoudripo to share your smooth tales of ice-drip coffee, or visit GetDripo.com, Facebook.com/GetDripo for more information.